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David Wong

Auditions

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Act has its Hamlet, further auditions in late March.

Auditions for Hamlet—the character, not HAMLET the play—have been successfully concluded.  He is Noah Nazim, 28, a relative newcomer to the Island from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Montreal. Noah and the Director, Terry Pratt, began fencing lessons today, January 10!

The other seven roles in this eight-actor version of Shakespeare’s most famous play, four men and three women, will be auditioned March 29 &30;. 

Performances will be at 4:00 pm, outside in Robert Cotton Park, Stratford, on the last two weekends of the summer, August 29-30 and Sept 5-7 (Labour Day weekend. ) Rehearsals will begin June 13 and continue on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. 
For further information about the production, contact the Director, Terry Pratt (tpratt@upei.ca, 675-3672).  To book an audition contact the Stage Manager,Sharon MacDonald.(sheamacd@gmail.com)

Posted by Bunty Albert on 01/10 at 10:31 PM
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Thursday, November 20, 2014

To be Hamlet, or not to be

Auditions for Hamlet (only)

ACT (a community theatre) is looking ahead to its fourth, late-summer offering of Shakespeare in Stratford’s Cotton Park.  After successful runs of Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Much Ado About Nothing, the company intends to mount the most famous play of them all, Hamlet – with the proviso that a suitable actor be found for the vital central role.  Auditions for the role of Hamlet only will be held throughout December.  Interested men, age 18-35, should email the producer for an appointment (bunty1948@gmail.com).  The director is Terry Pratt and the Stage Manager is Sharon MacDonald.  The play will be done with 8 actors in total, and will run as matinees on two weekends: August 29-30 and September 5-7 (Labour Day).

Posted by Bunty Albert on 11/20 at 02:39 PM
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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

AUDITION CALL - for Citizens of Our Town

Want to be a part of the re-mounting of ACT’s very first show?

  Most people who know anything about theatre know about Our Town.  It’s the Thornton Wilder classic which gets performed at least once a day somewhere in the world.  It will be performed in our Charlotte’s town on a half-a-dozen days next April.  That’s when ACT (a community theatre) will celebrate the troupe’s 20th anniversary with the play that started them going back in 1995.
  Auditions for the fresh production are coming up.  Plenty of parts are to be cast: there are approximately two dozen citizens of Our Town, in a roughly balanced mix of men and women.  Two of the major roles are for teenagers, and children of several ages are also needed.
  Rehearsals will start in January, and will be held using a combination of Tuesday evenings (to be confirmed), Saturday and Sunday afternoons.
  The Director is Paul Whelan, and he is backed by a strong production team of ACT veterans.
  To audition, a person will be asked to read from the script, but may also bring a prepared piece of their own .  To arrange an audition, contact Kim Johnston at 902-621-0645 or johnstonk@hotmail.com.  Appointments are available on Saturday afternoon, November 15th, or possibly by special arrangement .  The location is Charlottetown Rural High School.
  To see a bit of history, click on ‘Gallery’ (in the upper right-hand corner) and look for photos from ACT’s very first production in 1995.

Posted by RobAdmin on 10/28 at 09:11 AM
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Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Auditions for INHERIT THE WIND

ACT’s next major production, partnering with Trinity United Church, Charlottetown, is INHERIT THE WIND.  Auditions are Sat.-Sun., Nov. 23-24, 1:00-5:00 p.m.  Rehearsals begin mid-January for performance April 24-27 in Trinity’s hall.  The Director is John Moses.  The SM is Sharon MacDonald.  Contact her for an audition time: sheamacd@gmail.com, or 432-2317.  Auditioners have the option of preparing a short monologue from any modern play.  Experience is not a requirement.

INHERIT THE WIND is based on a real courtroom case, the so-called “Scopes Monkey Trial” of 1925, in the town of Dayton, Tennessee.  At that time, and right until 1967, the state had a law against the teaching of evolution in its schools.  A number of local citizens decided to challenge this law with a show trial – chiefly in order to profit from the publicity.  They persuaded John Scopes, a substitute teacher (who might have presented the evolution chapter from the state-sponsored textbook he was using in one class period; he couldn’t remember), to act as defendant, and they persuaded two famous national figures to be counsels on either side.  For the prosecution they secured William Jennings Bryan, a fundamentalist Christian who had been the Democratic nominee for President three times, and for the defence they had a famous Chicago lawyer, Clarence Darrow, an agnostic who had recently defended two notorious killers.  The two were considered to be among the greatest orators of their day.

During the trial the Judge refused to hear any of the defence’s expert witnesses, ruling that their plausible explanations of evolution were irrelevant to the question of whether Scopes had broken the law.  In a highly irregular proceeding, Darrow called Bryan himself was as an expert witness on the Bible, in order to ridicule his views on creation.  The tactic worked – but still, Scopes was found guilty.

This trial, a battle of giants—which pitted a literal interpretation of the Bible against modern science,  unexamined faith against the right to think, the rural U.S. south against the urbanized north – did indeed garner publicity.  In fact it was the first-ever media circus.  It was covered by 200 journalists, who daily filed about 165,00 words that went round the world.  It was the first trial to be broadcast on live radio.  Hawkers of all kinds came to town to profit from the crowds.  Trained chimpanzees performed on the courthouse lawn.  Today the courthouse itself is preserved as an historic landmark, and features re-enactments of parts of the trial.

Both sides claimed victory, the fundamentalists because the law was upheld (though Scopes was fined only $100 and the verdict was later overturned on a technicality), and the modernists because widespread scorn was heaped on the other side.

INHERIT THE WIND was first performed in 1955.  It played on Broadway for two years, and at the Old Vic in London, and it has been revived in professional and amateur theatres many times.  It was made into a movie and into films for television, with famous actors in the leading roles.  The authors, Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, have said that in 1955 they wanted to draw attention to another attack on freedom of thought, the witch-hunts of the McCarthy era.  But the play’s original theme continues to resonate on its own, and is sufficient reason for further performances.  Creationism, as we now call it, is far from dead and the theory of evolution is far from explaining everything.  There are many – including President George W. Bush – who argue that the two sides should be given equal footing in schools.  Many church-goers are not sure what to make of the Biblical story of creation, and many non-religious people are quite ignorant of modern evolutionary theory.  In any case, the fight against unthinking dogmatism must be taken up by every generation.

INHERIT THE WIND is gripping courtroom drama.  To enhance the drama it takes several liberties with the facts, and the preface explicitly rejects the notion that the play is “history.”  The names of the two leading characters are changed to Matthew Harrison Brady and Henry Drummond.  A real-life, wise-cracking journalist, H.L. Mencken (who invented the phrase “monkey trial”) is here E.K. Hornbeck, who provides an element of humour in the play.  John Scopes is Bertram Cates.  There are many other fascinating characters in the cast, some entirely fictitious: Rev. Jeremiah Brown who preaches hell-fire for sinners like Cates; his daughter Rachel, who loves Cates but is under her father’s thumb and is impressed by Brady; the biased Judge; the Mayor; the Jailer; two children in Cates’ class, a mountain man; a radio broadcaster; Brady’s wife; members of the jury and the Ladies’ Aid, and other townspeople.  The town itself is “Hillsboro,” which could be almost any town in the American south.  So strong and popular is the play that many viewers take it to be, literally, the Scopes Monkey Trial.

ACT (a community theatre) and Trinity United Church have combined to put on this drama April 24-27, 2014, in Trinity’s church hall.  The first two performances will be dinner theatre.  For all performances, auditioners who don’t secure a speaking part will be invited to be characters in the drama, townspeople in costume, who freely ad lib their own attitudes towards the trial, as they welcome the visitors to their town, serve them food, and take as much money from them as they can. 

There are twenty speaking roles.  They include only four parts for women, but the Director may dress some women as men.  The extras as above can be of either gender, all female if necessary. 

A strong production team is behind this play.  The Director is John Moses, the Minister at Trinity United, who has directed this play elsewhere, as well as several other plays at Trinity.  The Stage Manager is Sharon MacDonald (Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream) who has taught the play in high school.  The Producer is Jennifer Shields, and the Costume Designer is Pam Jewell.  Other team members are Terry Pratt and Rob Thomson.

Successful auditioners must be either members of the Trinity congregation or members of ACT.  They should also be prepared to assist this show or another as crew members, in the spirit of community theatre.

Posted by ACT One Editor on 10/02 at 06:21 PM
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Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Macbeth Audition Call

Auditions for the September production of Macbeth by ACT will be held March 24, 2012.  Contact bunty1948@gmail.com

Audition Call for Macbeth
ACT (a community theatre) will be producing Macbeth, outdoors in Cotton Park, Stratford, September 6-8 and 13-15.  The play is being presented in conjunction with the Stratfords of the World 2012 reunion being held on Prince Edward Island.  There will be public performances September 6-8 and 13, and special performances on September 14 and 15 for delegates to the reunion.  Rehearsals will begin the first week of June and continue all summer.
The cast will include 14 men and 6 women.  Actors 18 and over are invited to audition.  Those who wish to audition are asked to read the play in advance.  If they wish they may also prepare a monologue from any of Shakespeare’s plays and take a copy of the monologue to the audition.
Auditions will be held on Saturday, March 24, all day.  Please e-mail: bunty1948@gmail.com to book an audition time.  After March 4, you can also call 651-3612.

Posted by Bunty Albert on 02/22 at 05:29 PM
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Thursday, October 30, 2008

Auditions for Christmas Remembered

Beaconsfield Historic Properties, in association with ACT (a community theatre) will reprise its Christmas Remembered production on December 20-21. The show is a collage of “round the fireside” stories, poetry and Christmas songs, which originally played in December 2005.

Auditions will be held on Monday, November 10, 7-9 pm. Two adult females and one child are required to complete the cast. Those auditioning will be asked to present a short, prepared reading and a song.

To book an audition or for further information, contact Brenda Porter (tel: 569-5633,  or by e-mail: by clicking on Brenda Porter link found below.

Posted by BrendaPorter on 10/30 at 05:16 PM
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