Strike at Putney Church - Quoting the Bible
Photographer -

Rowena Stinson

Monday, June 28, 2004

Love Your Playwrights

The greatest thing came with my New Yorker this week. Included in an advertisement for (oops can’t remember) there was a very large I heart (love) _fill your own thing in______ bumper sticker. At first I thought I would write I love poetry because I do. On reconsideration I thought I should write, I love drama. (too my grandmother’s kitchen) then, I love Canadian drama (too television).then, I love plays.(too generic). What really got my heart racing was, I love CANADIAN PLAYS! So with the recommended waterproof fat marker I wrote in bold letters, I love Canadian PLAYS. I carefully cleaned off a spot on the back of my 1996 Honda minivan and stuck it on. YES. Then I hopped in and drove past Neptune Theatre, wishing there had been room to write I LOVE CANADIAN PLAYS ON THE MAINSTAGES OF OUR REGIONAL THEATRES. But for now I feel incredibly good about my I love Canadian plays bumper sticker and urge all other PGC members (and other lovers of Canadian plays) to rush out and buy this week’s New Yorker (fiction issue) and with a fat marker create a bumper sticker supporting Canadian plays/playwrights. Hey I might just have to buy another issue myself, for a, I love Canadian Playwrights, they’re so sexy——the possibilities are endless.

Catherine Banks
Playwright

- From TheatrePEI newsletter

Posted by webmaster on 06/28 at 01:21 PM
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Sunday, June 27, 2004

The Island Arts & Heritage Stabilization Program

A joint project of Canada, Prince Edward Island and the Private Sector

The Mission: To enable increased financial viability, self reliance and capacity for PEI-based Arts and Heritage Organizations in a manner that allows the artistic missions and managerial practices of those organizations to be brought to a new level over the long term.

Applications for Assistance Are Now Available

Deadline for Submission - June 30, 2004

For Application Form and Guidelines Please Contact

Katy Baker, Executive Director
Island Arts and Heritage Stabilization Program
119 - 121 Queen St. Suite 105
Charlottetown, PE C1A 4B3
T - (902) 892-1394 E - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Posted by webmaster on 06/27 at 01:25 PM
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Saturday, June 26, 2004

Victoria Playhouse Festival launches 23rd season

The Victoria Playhouse Festival launches its 23rd season on June 24th with the Gothic ghost story The Woman In Black, one of the most exciting and gripping theatre events ever to staged in Victoria! Season ‘six-pack’ passes are on sale until June 24th. The pass entitles one to attend any 6 performances for the price of 5. Call the Playhouse at 658-2025 or 1-800-925-2025 or visit the website at www.victoriaplayhouse.com for the complete Festival listings.

Victoria Playhouse Festival
PEI’s Longest Running Little Theatre
Celebrating 22 years of theatre, musical concerts, storytelling and comedy events
(P) 902.658.2025
(F) 902.658.2118

Posted by webmaster on 06/26 at 01:23 PM
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Wednesday, June 23, 2004

Lobster Poaching Trials are back

Four years ago “The Lobster Poaching Trials” dinner theatre by John Cartwright was written in the style more common in Europe where actors do not also function a waiters. The trials are back for the third season this time at the Red Rock Restaurant in Summerside each Wednesday starting June 7th.  The play is presented between appetisers and the main course and involve the audience in the hilarious action with characters such as Alkaline Ike.

The Lobster Poaching Trials provides a fun evening with a great meal and a chance to see a different presentation of dinner theatre.

Posted by webmaster on 06/23 at 01:22 PM
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Tuesday, June 22, 2004

FACT Sheet: The ARTS in Canada

The contribution of the arts to healthy communities and citizens:

<ul>
<li>
Economic research indicates that skilled, mobile workers choose to live in dynamic, vibrant communities - with active downtown cores. These communities have competed most effectively in the past, and they are expected to continue doing so - which makes quality of life issues increasingly important in the global economy.

(http://www.creativeclass.org/author.shtml)
</li>

<li>
“Canada’s cultural integrity will be a key issue confronting the nation in the coming decade. Faced with the threat of international cultural uniformity, we must affirm the diversity of our cultural expression, the uniqueness of the threads that make up our pluralistic nation.  A strong, healthy cultural community, one that embraces all the possibilities the new knowledge economy can offer, is vital to the continued evolution of the Canadian identity.” Max Wyman, The Defiant Imagination.
</li>

<li>
Arts and culture can help put a community “on the map” domestically and internationally - Chemainus, British Columbia, for example, which has turned its economy around by creating historic murals and statues to attract tourists.  Now known as “The Little Town That Did,” Chemainus’ revitalization efforts are being heralded by many international arts councils, including the California Arts Council. The same can be said for many other communities across Canada.

(http://www.cac.ca.gov/impact/resources.cfm)
</li>

<li>
Municipal governments recognize the vital importance of arts and culture, and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) has developed the following official policy statement on community economic development:


“The promotion, development and preservation of arts, cultural and heritage sites greatly contribute to the quality of life of communities. The quality of life of a community directly affects the ability of a municipality to attract skilled / talented labour.  Arts, cultural and heritage sites also play a role in attracting tourist and tourist dollars into a community.  FCM values the importance of arts, culture and heritage and advocates for tax incentives and funding mechanisms to preserve built heritage and promote arts and culture.”

(http://www.fcm.ca/english/)
</li>

<li>
“The ability of residents to participate in cultural activities enhances the livability of cities.  Cities must be showcases of culture - regional, national and international.  Preserving, promoting and celebrating culture is vital to the competitiveness of cities. . Culture is an often neglected part of the urban dialogue.  In other cities in other countries, cultural competitiveness has been elevated to now be a vital component for any city wishing to be regarded as a sophisticated worldly and ‘adult’ city.” Elyse Allan, President & CEO,
The Toronto Board of Trade, Toronto Arts Council Budget Request, December 2002
</li>

<li>
“The arts . have a way of opening the mind.  They stimulate the synapses, and make one more receptive to creativity. . As a scientist, I want my imagination rekindled.  I want to be shown how to look at things in new ways.  And I believe my capacity for innovation and creativity in my own discipline will grow as a result.  That’s one good reason for promoting arts education.  At a time when Canada is racing to keep at the forefront of knowledge and innovation, I would say that this reason alone should make every policy maker a champion of the arts.”  Dr. Arthur Carty, President, The National Research Council of Canada Arts Education Symposium, 2000
</li></ul>


What kind of Canada do you want?

<ul>
<li>
96% of Canadians believe that the arts are an essential part of children’s education.  (StatsCan)
</li>

<li>
91% of Canadians believe that the arts define Canada’s national identity. (Ipsos-Reid)
</li>

<li>
93% of Canadians believe that arts activities contribute to the vitality of their communities. (Ipsos-Reid).
</li>

<li>
Two thirds of Canadians believe that government and the private sector - together - should support activities that strengthen community. (Imagine/StatsCan)
</li>
</ul>

Funding and the Economic Impact of the Arts:

<ul>
<li>
The total projected federal program spending budget for 2003/2004 is $142.05 billion. (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)
</li>

<li>
The Department of Canadian Heritage is projected to receive $2.86 billion in 2003/2004, and of this, the performing arts received less than 1%. (www.ccarts.ca/eng/home_e.htm )
</li>

<li>
Nearly 75% of total government expenditures on culture in 2001-02 were on libraries, broadcasting (primarily the CBC) and heritage resources. The performing arts received roughly 5% of total funding. (www.canadacouncil.ca)
</li>

<li>
The not for profit arts have experienced declines in per capita federal and provincial funding over the past decade. Statistics Canada.The Daily: Government Expenditures on Culture, May 27, 2001.
</li>

<li>
Although support from the private sector has increased over the same period, the arts received only 5% of the total number of donations made to charities in Canada in 2000. (www.givingandvolunteering.ca )
</li>

<li>
The renewal of The Tomorrow Starts Today program, which provided $500 million in additional federal funding to the arts over three years included $75 million to The Canada Council for the Arts for the same period, is uncertain.
</li>

<li>
The Theatre Section of The Canada Council for the Arts, received 20% of the total $113.7 million in grants given out by The Council in 2000/2001. (www.canadacouncil.ca )
</li>

<li>
Arts and cultural activities contribute $26 billion to Canada’s gross domestic product, and they employ roughly 740,000 people.
(http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/87F0001XIE/free.htm)
</li></ul>


Resources:
<ul><li>
Canadian Conference of the Arts:
http://www.ccarts.ca/eng/04res/04_02rpt.htm
</li>
<li>
Canada Council for the Arts:
http://www.canadacouncil.ca/aboutus/advocacy/
</li>
<li>
The Creative Class, by Richard Florida:
http://www.creativeclass.org/book.shtml
</li>
<li>
The Defiant Imagination, by Max Wyman:
http://www.straight.com/content.cfm?id=1509
</li>
<li>
Federation of Canadian Municipalities:
http://www.fcm.ca/english/
</li></ul>

Posted by webmaster on 06/22 at 12:58 PM
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Theatre Today - Gone Tomorrow?

We all Win with Candidates that Support Increased Arts Funding

Toronto - During this federal election, the Professional Association of Canadian Theatres (PACT) is urging all party candidates to commit $300 million annually in permanent funding to The Canada Council for the Arts.  This represents just 0.2% of the federal government’s projected 2003/2004 total program spending budget - but the impact on quality of
life for Canadians would be hundredfold.

For $8 per Canadian per year - less than the cost of a movie ticket - performing and visual arts organizations would be able to keep admission prices accessible to more Canadians, especially youth. And when communities can access the arts, we all win.

Read Full Article >>>

Posted by webmaster on 06/22 at 12:56 PM
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Online Arts “Discussion Forums”

Dear Members of the Arts and Culture Communities,

Since my arrival at the PEI Council of the Arts I have been impressed with the discussions taking place around various issues of great importance, as well as the topics of importance to the various disciplines.

However, the email versions of these conversations are often limited to the individual participants, and it can become a chore to try to disseminate all the information to all the correct parties.

To that end, I have added to our web site (as part of an ongoing redesign) an online, and public, “Discussion Forums” section.

Each of you have the opportunity to register, and contribute with ideas, concerns, tips, opportunities, postings etc. It is a tool and a resource for the entire arts community. With time, and participation, it can become a valuable storehouse of information as it is also searchable. At this time, the forum is un-moderated, in other words, nobody will read or edit your post before it appears.

I invite you all to visit the forums, you’ll see that some have already registered and made some posts. Please feel welcome to do so yourselves. We welcome additional suggestions on topics or categories, and you may write to me at any time with comments or concerns.

To visit the forums, please see:

http://www.peiartscouncil.com/forums/

- from PEI Arts Council

Posted by webmaster on 06/22 at 12:46 PM
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Monday, June 14, 2004

ACT Out - Word Play

The next Act-Out will take place on Saturday, June 26.  We will attend WORD PLAYS, an evening of drama celebrating verbal expression.  The presentation consists of three one-act plays centered around language.  Included are:

I REMAIN ... JANE AUSTEN, a one-woman play featuring Barbara Rhodenhizer;

THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE, a one-act comedy featuring Jodi MacDonald and Connor Youngerman;

YOUR OBEDIENT SERVANT: AN EVENING WITH SAMUEL JOHNSON (Act I), featuring Terry Pratt.

The plays take place at Beaconsfield Carriage House in Charlottetown.  Starting time is 8 p.m.  Members should call 368-6603 to reserve tickets.

Supper will be at Cedar’s Eatery, 81 University Avenue, at 6 p.m.  Please contact Janet Macdonald at 892-4006 BEFORE JUNE 24 if you plan to join us for the meal.

Posted by EH_Support on 06/14 at 03:29 PM
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Friday, June 11, 2004

Shakespeare Can Be Fun . . . For Kids!

Shakespeare Can Be Fun . . . For Kids!

Back by popular demand, The Stratford Youth-Can-Do Players present their second annual Shakespearean performance on Friday, June 18th at 8pm and Saturday, June 19th at 4pm and 8pm in the Joseph L. Cotton Park on the Bunbury Road in Stratford. This year’s play is Lois Burdett’s Shakespeare Can Be Fun! A Midsummer Night’s Dream for Kids. It is a walk-along play with all of the action happening outdoors using the park’s natural surroundings. Fifteen Stratford youth from the ages of 12 to 17 are taking part in this year’s creative and energetic production. Come and join fairies, mixed-up lovers a donkey named Bottom and a jolly crew of young actors in a show not to be forgotten. This show is suitable for all ages and free for children and students. The production is directed by Emily Hanlin.

Posted by webmaster on 06/11 at 01:23 PM
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A Just So-Mask Experience

The Creative Dramatics Mask Troupe will present two of Rudyard Kipling’s beloved Just-So Stories on June 12 at noon and 2pm Confederation Landing Park in Charlottetown. The members of this troupe have spent the last several months creating a menagerie of masks from an array of materials. This mask experience will take place as outdoor theatre-in the round and audience members are invited to bring lawn chairs. So, come and celebrate creativity and discover how the Camel Got His Hump and meet the curious Elephant’s Child . This show is suitable for all ages and free to the public.

Posted by webmaster on 06/11 at 01:20 PM
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